Cabinet and frontbench minister appointments: Live updates as government announcements continue – LabourList (2024)

Table of Contents
TUESDAY JULY 9: 7.36pm: Former shadow cabinet member joins Labour Together 7.23pm: Veterans minister after all 7.15pm: More interesting appointments 7pm: Many frontbenchers keep their brief – but not all 6.50pm: Jess Phillips is back on frontbench months after Gaza resignation 6.45pm: Fast promotions for new MPs 6.40pm: A flood of further appointments MONDAY JULY 8: 4.30pm: Updated frontbench list 3pm: Starmer on Thornberry 11.20am: Anneliese Dodds for development and equalities 11.02am: Angela Eagle back on frontbench – and in Home Office 10.55am: Thornberry’s statement after not maintaining cabinet post 10.50am: Poacher turned gamekeeper 10.47am: Kinnock moves department 10.45am: NTS in for Jon Ashworth 10.35am: A flood of appointments 9am: Is today the day? SATURDAY JULY 6: 11pm: Ellie Reeves becomes party chair and minister 9.30pm: See the full list of the shadow versus government frontbench 9.14pm: More ministerial appointments 2pm: Starmer ‘restless for change’ 12.47pm: Follow updates on Keir Starmer’s speech at news conference 12.40pm: Photo of the new cabinet ahead of news conference 12pm: A video from inside the cabinet meeting 11.55am: Rachel Reeves’ message 11.50am: Starmer’s message to cabinet 11.40am: The most state-school educated cabinet ever 11.30am: Photos of the new cabinet… 10.50am: One take on it all 10.40am (Saturday): New ministers arrive for cabinet FRIDAY JULY 5: 7.37pm: A familar face 7.18pm: Landslide majority – what next? 7.14pm: Richard Hermer is Attorney General 6.48pm: Cabinet taking shape 5.53pm: Northern Ireland office 5.40pm: Nandy takes the Debbonaire vacancy 5.27pm: ‘Honour of my life’ 4.51pm: Three more appointments 4.45pm: Liz Kendall confirmed 4.37pm: Recap – who’s in so far 4.15pm: Education, education, education 4.10pm: Streeting in to oversee NHS 4.06pm: Shabana Mahmood to be Justice Secretary 3.56pm: How will Starmer govern? 3.53pm: Key confirmations continue 3.44pm: McFadden confirmed as Chancellor of the Duchy 3.32pm: Miliband enters Downing Street 3.29pm: Britain’s first female Chancellor 3.23pm: International congratulations roll in 3.19pm: Rayner confirmed as Deputy Prime Minister 3.18pm: Labour in business 3.14pm: Will there be any surprises? 3.07pm: More big names arriving 3.02pm: David Lammy at Number 10 2.56pm: More top figures showing up at Downing Street 2.52pm: Reeves arrives to be appointed Chancellor 2.51pm: Farage faces protests at post-election speech 2.43pm: Pat McFadden becomes second to enter the building 2.38pm: Angela Rayner goes into Number 10 2.32pm: Chief Whip enters Cabinet Office

Prime Minister Keir Starmer continues to make appointments to top roles in government, as the new Labour administration’s first full working week continues.

While the cabinet and dozens of frontbench roles have been picked, decisions now continue over who will get many more junior ministerial jobs in the coming hours and days.

LabourList will be keeping you up to date with the latest developments – follow below and refresh this page for new updates.

You can also see our full, searchable list of new cabinet ministers and junior ministers as things stand here, comparing roles between the previous shadow and new government frontbench teams to see the moves made (or not).

LabourList analysis suggests there were 133 shadow frontbenchers across the Commons and Lords shortly before the election, though seven stood down and two lost their seats.

Only 109 paid ministers can be appointed in government, according to the Institute for Government, with a cap of 95 in the Commons, though the number of parliamentary private secretaries and trade envoys is unrestricted and dozens were appointed under the Conservatives.

READ MORE: ‘What should we look for in Keir Starmer’s cabinet?’

TUESDAY JULY 9:

7.36pm: Former shadow cabinet member joins Labour Together

Not a government appointment, but still significant – the former shadow cabinet member Jon Ashworth, who lost his Leicester seat at the election, has been appointed the new leader of the influential Starmerite think tank Labour Together.

It comes after its former chief Josh Simons was elected as the new MP for Makerfield.

More on that appointment and what it signals here…

7.23pm: Veterans minister after all

After questions and criticism about Labour seemingly not having a veterans’ minister (though part of that was about it not being a cabinet role)…Alistair Carns has been appointed “Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Defence (Minister for Veterans)“.

Congrats to another of the class of 24 rising swiftly through the ranks. Carns is a former marine.

7.15pm: More interesting appointments

Former New Labour minister Philip Hunt is an interesting appointment, and perhaps another signal of the leadership’s desire to tap experience from the New Labour government.

He’ll be in the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero. He worked in the equivalent department between 2008 and 2010, alongside his now boss Ed Miliband.

Meanwhile Labour peer Maggie Jones, a former Labour party chair and trade union official, has joined the frontbench,and will serve as a parliamentary under-secretary leading on science, innovation, technology, business, trade and the whip operation (peers often cover multiple briefs…)

7pm: Many frontbenchers keep their brief – but not all

No surprises on many appointments, from James Murray and Tulip Siddiq remaining on the Treasury brief to Justin Madders remaining in Business and Trade or Emma Hardy in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

There are some sideways moves though – Abena Oppong-Asare moves from shadow minister for women’s health and mental health to be a parliamentary secretary in the Cabinet Office.

For Stephen Morgan, there’s a yo-yo move – the former shadow schools minister-turned-shadow-transport-minister is back covering education again at the Department for Education as a parliamentary under-secretary of state.

6.50pm: Jess Phillips is back on frontbench months after Gaza resignation

Jess Phillips is back on the frontbench, in a striking return just months after she resigned her shadow post to back a Gaza ceasefire motion in the Commons.

She’s in the Home Office, which she previously shadowed on domestic violence and safeguarding work. She is widely respected for her work championing women’s rights.

If you haven’t seen this from the other day –it’s worth a watch!

'Seeing as I'm sat here in my pyjamas, it seems unlikely I'll be in the cabinet.'

Jess Phillips says she probably won't be appointed to a prominent position, but tells @lewis_goodall that she's 'best placed where she can be the loudest'. pic.twitter.com/yiy5Hl3kkn

— LBC (@LBC) July 7, 2024

6.45pm: Fast promotions for new MPs

At a glance…it’s remarkable that new MPs Georgia Gould, Miatta Fahnbulleh, Kirsty McNeill, Sarah Sackman and Alistair Carns have all been handed ministerial posts within days of being elected, but a real sign of their experience or prior relationships.

Georgia Gould goes to the Cabinet Office. The former Camden council leader spearheaded a mission-led approach to local government there.

Fahnbulleh previously ran the New Economics Foundation think tank, and will serve under Miliband (and alongside newish and newly promoted Rutherglen MP Michael Shanks), in the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero.

Lawyer Sarah Sackman becomes Solicitor General.

Alongside the three new London MPs, new Scottish MP Kirsty McNeill will work with Ian Murray in the Scotland Office.

Meanwhile Emma Reynolds, new MP for Wycombe but a former MP for Wolverhampton, has a role spanning both the Department for Work and Pensions and the Treasury.

6.40pm: A flood of further appointments

A Number 10 says spokespesron said the following appointments have just been made (writes Tom)…

  • Rt Hon Lord Hunt of Kings Heath OBE as Minister of State in the Department of Energy Security and Net Zero.
  • Rt Hon Sir David Hanson as a Minister of State in the Home Office (and he’ll get a peerage to enable it).
  • Georgia Gould MP as a Parliamentary Secretary in the Cabinet Office;
  • Abena Oppong-Asare MP as a Parliamentary Secretary in the Cabinet Office;
  • James Murray MP as a Parliamentary Secretary (Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury) in His Majesty’s Treasury;
  • Tulip Siddiq MP as a Parliamentary Secretary (Economic Secretary to the Treasury and City Minister) in His Majesty’s Treasury;
  • Emma Reynolds MP as a Parliamentary Secretary in His Majesty’s Treasury and the Department of Work and Pensions;
  • Catherine West MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office;
  • Lord Collins of Highbury as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, Deputy Leader of the House of Lords, and Lord in Waiting (Government Whip)
  • Seema Malhotra MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Home Office;
  • Jess Phillips MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Home Office;
  • Luke Pollard MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Defence;
  • Alistair Carns MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Defence (Minister for Veterans);
  • Alex Davies-Jones MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Justice;
  • Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Justice and as a Lord in Waiting (Government Whip);bh
  • Alex Norris MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government;
  • Rushanara Ali MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government;
  • Baroness Taylor of Stevenage as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and as a Baroness in Waiting (Government Whip);
  • Lord Khan of Burnley as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government;
  • Andrew Gwynne MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department of Health and Social Care;
  • Baroness Merron as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department of Health and Social Care;
  • Stephen Morgan MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Education;
  • Janet Daby MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Education;
  • Kerry McCarthy MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero;
  • gf MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero;
  • Miatta Fahnbulleh MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero;
  • Andrew Western MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department of Work and Pensions;
  • Baroness Sherlock OBE as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department of Work and Pensions;
  • Justin Madders MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Business and Trade;
  • Gareth Thomas MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Business and Trade;
  • Feryal Clark MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology;
  • Baroness Jones of Whitchurch as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology and the Department for Business and Trade, and as a Baroness in Waiting (Government Whip);
  • Simon Lightwood MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Transport;
  • Lilian Greenwood MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Transport;
  • Mike Kane MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Transport;
  • Emma Hardy MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;
  • Baroness Hayman of Ullock as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;
  • Stephanie Peaco*ck MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport;
  • Fleur Anderson MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Northern Ireland Office;
  • Kirsty McNeill MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Scotland Office;
  • Dame Nia Griffith DBE MP as a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Wales Office.
  • Sarah Sackman MP as Solicitor General.

MONDAY JULY 8:

4.30pm: Updated frontbench list

Following further ministerial appointments today, our searchable list of Labour’s frontbench has now been updated.

You can check out who has been assigned where so far here.

3pm: Starmer on Thornberry

Keir Starmer has said Emily Thornberry has a “big part to play”… (see below).

The Guardian reports he said earlier on a visit in Wales: “I’m putting together a very strong team based on delivering.

“We got a very strong mandate at the general election, a mandate for change, a mandate for doing politics differently, and about service. That’s why I’m putting my team together.

“Emily Thornberry has been fantastic, she’s got a big part to play, as has every single one of my now 412 Labour MPs.”

11.20am: Anneliese Dodds for development and equalities

Anneliese Dodds is now a minister of state in the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, and also retains the women and equalities brief – within the Department for Education. She will be attending cabinet, as we she was photographed doing on Saturday.

11.02am: Angela Eagle back on frontbench – and in Home Office

Congratulations to Angela Eagle as she makes a return to the frontbench – and to the Home Office for the first time in 22 years. She was a parliamentary secretary there in 2001-2. She’s now a minister of state (writes Tom).

10.55am: Thornberry’s statement after not maintaining cabinet post

Emily Thornberry is “sorry and surprised” not to be able to continue her work in government, after she was replaced in the Attorney General brief.

She issued this statement:

Thanks to everyone who has been in touch asking about my own future in the new Labour government. Here is my statement 👇🏽 pic.twitter.com/dRlW0RaW1D

— Emily Thornberry (@EmilyThornberry) July 8, 2024

10.50am: Poacher turned gamekeeper

Stephen Timms makes a return to the frontbench, being appointed a minister of state for work and pensions. He was previously chair of the work and pensions select committee.

10.47am: Kinnock moves department

Stephen Kinnock has been appointed a minister in the Department of Health and Social Care – particularly notable as he was previously shadow immigration minister.

10.45am: NTS in for Jon Ashworth

Notably, Nick Thomas-Symonds has been appointed Paymaster General, and a Cabinet Office minister for the constitution and European relations.

It comes after former Shadow Paymaster General Jon Ashworth lost his seat.

10.35am: A flood of appointments

Here we go…

New list of Labour appointments – looks like a reshuffle of the immigration minister among other changes. pic.twitter.com/r8FOe1SJce

— Aubrey Allegretti (@breeallegretti) July 8, 2024

9am: Is today the day?

There’s a lot of posts to fill in government, and a lot of shadow frontbenchers hovering by the phone. There were no further appointments we could see on Sunday, but at the start of the working week we wouldn’t be surprised if we get a fair few more today. Updates as we get them (writes editor Tom Belger).

SATURDAY JULY 6:

11pm: Ellie Reeves becomes party chair and minister

Deputy national campaign co-ordinator Reeves is now party chair and a minister without portfolio in the Cabinet Office, replacing Anneliese Dodds who looks set to fill Lisa Nandy’s former development brief as a minister (Nandy now has the culture, media and sport brief vacated by now-former MP Thangam Debbonaire).

More on that here – note no formal confirmation yet though of Dodds’ new role.

It has been an honour to serve as Party Chair for the last 3 years, getting the Labour Party back in the service of working people and meeting so many dedicated @UKLabour members right across the country.

Many congratulations to @elliereeves, who I know will do a brilliant job! https://t.co/Nd4lLfMtS5

— Anneliese Dodds (@AnnelieseDodds) July 6, 2024

Main surprise of Cabinet appointments was Starmer not appointing a Secretary of State for Women & Equalities. Which minister(s) to lead on Equalities tbc

Anneliese Dodds attended Cabinet, with placecard saying Minister of International Development (tbc)https://t.co/TYvomwOkHN

— Sunder Katwala (@sundersays) July 6, 2024

9.30pm: See the full list of the shadow versus government frontbench

We’ve updated our list here of the shadow frontbench with those that have had posts announced, and a long list of the rest who are waiting to see their futures confirmed…

9.14pm: More ministerial appointments

More appointments to Keir Starmer’s frontbench have been announced this evening, with Douglas Alexander, newly returned to Westminster at this election, given a role as a minister in the Department for Business and Trade, while former MP Jacqui Smith will receive a peerage as she is made minister in the Department for Education.

Starmer has therefore made 33 appointments so far as of Saturday night.

The full list of newly-announced appointments is as follows:

  • Ellie Reeves MP as a minister of state in the Cabinet Office (minister without portfolio)
  • Dan Jarvis MBE MP as a minister of state in the Home Office
  • Jim McMahon OBE MP as a minister of state in the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities
  • Matthew Pennycook MP as a minister of state in the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities
  • Douglas Alexander MP as a minister of state in the Department for Business and Trade
  • Jacqui Smith as a minister of state in the Department for Education

2pm: Starmer ‘restless for change’

Keir Starmer has said “country first, party second” will be a test for all decisions in his first news conference as Prime Minister today, “turning our back on tribal politics” following Labour’s historic landslide general election victory.

The Labour leader said he was “restless for change” and had a mandate for it from all four nations, but promised “raw honesty” about challenges like the NHS being “broken” – and said tough decisions would come early.

Labour will “repay the trust” of those backing the party for the first time, he added. He signalled the Rwanda scheme is dead too.

More here on his news conference.

12.47pm: Follow updates on Keir Starmer’s speech at news conference

Follow the latest here on Starmer’s news conference in our separate blog, expected from 1pm.

We’ll bring more ministerial appointment updates if we see them.

12.40pm: Photo of the new cabinet ahead of news conference

Prime Minister @Keir_Starmer chaired his first Cabinet this morning.

He outlined the government’s mission to restore Britain to the service of working people. pic.twitter.com/M7d8e9k8Dz

UK Prime Minister (@10DowningStreet) July 6, 2024

12pm: A video from inside the cabinet meeting

This was before the media were ushered out for the real business…

First pictures emerge from Downing Street as new PM Keir Starmer holds his first cabinet meeting

Follow live https://t.co/wKEqmnheKv pic.twitter.com/6AbxGTNUHq

— BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) July 6, 2024

11.55am: Rachel Reeves’ message

Ministers have been putting out statements and videos since taking up post. Here’s one of the latest from Rachel Reeves, on restoring growth being a “national mission”:

Restoring economic growth is now our national mission.

It's a new start – and I'm ready to get to work. pic.twitter.com/9uW7ZJwWzC

— Rachel Reeves (@RachelReevesMP) July 6, 2024

11.50am: Starmer’s message to cabinet

The Guardian reports what Starmer told his first meeting in its liveblog:

“Look colleagues, it is absolutely fantastic to welcome you to the Cabinet, our first meeting.

“And it was the honour and privilege of my life to be invited by the King, His Majesty the King yesterday to form a government and to form the Labour Government of 2024. And now we hold our first Cabinet meeting. So I welcome you to it.

“We have a huge amount of work to do, so now we get on with our work.”

11.40am: The most state-school educated cabinet ever

Some 92% (23 cabinet ministers) were educated at comprehensive schools, while only 4% (one) went to an independent school and 4% (one) attended a grammar school, according to social mobility charity the Sutton Trust.

That said, they also suggest that of the 25 Cabinet ministers, 40% went to Oxford or Cambridge – so anyone hoping an end to Tory rule meant an end to Oxbridge domination of government may be disappointed…

Nick Harrison, chief executive of the Sutton Trust, said: “This Cabinet is the most diverse in terms of education background ever recorded. It represents real progress towards smashing the class ceiling in politics, and it’s the closest to genuinely reflecting the proportion of Brits who went to comprehensive schools.

“But we now need to see this Cabinet deliver policies that will help tackle the barriers that are stopping many young people getting on in life.”

11.30am: Photos of the new cabinet…

We have our first Labour cabinet meeting!

Finally, after 14 years, a @UKLabour cabinet.

Fantastic! pic.twitter.com/pzxyzob5CQ

— Bill Esterson (@Bill_Esterson) July 6, 2024

10.50am: One take on it all

A shameless plug to watch my two cents on all things Labour in government on the BBC News channel shortly after 11am here – I imagine they’ll ask about the cabinet

10.40am (Saturday): New ministers arrive for cabinet

Good morning. Editor Tom here re-starting this blog for today…

Deputy Prime Minister Angela Rayner and Chancellor Rachel Reeves were first to arrive before 9am this morning for the first cabinet meeting, and a string of other new cabinet members followed after 10am.

I still can’t quite believe I’m watching Labour MPs strolling into Downing Street…

FRIDAY JULY 5:

7.37pm: A familar face

Sir Patrick Vallance KCB, previously Government Chief Scientific Adviser and well known for his appearances on Covid briefings, has been appointed Minister of State (Minister for Science) in the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology.

In another appointment from outside politics, James Timpson was also made Minister of State (Minister for Prisons, Parole and Probation) in the Ministry of Justice.

Sir Patrick Vallance KCB has been appointed Minister of State (Minister for Science) in the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology @SciTechgovuk. pic.twitter.com/eRnsu5eAQO

— UK Prime Minister (@10DowningStreet) July 5, 2024

7.18pm: Landslide majority – what next?

“What we are witnessing today is a rarity in British politics. Power has changed hands just twice in the last 40 years, and the Labour Party has not managed a transition for more than 27,” Phil Tinline writes.

Read the full opinion piece here.

7.14pm: Richard Hermer is Attorney General

Richard Hermer KC is the latest appointment in Starmer’s cabinet as Attorney General. Emily Thornberry had held the shadow portfolio.

Richard Hermer KC has been appointed Attorney General @attorneygeneral.

He will attend Cabinet. pic.twitter.com/KCdGX4OZB8

— UK Prime Minister (@10DowningStreet) July 5, 2024

6.48pm: Cabinet taking shape

Further appointments to Keir Starmer’s cabinet now include:

  • Darren Jones as Chief Secretary to the Treasury (attending cabinet)
  • Sir Alan Campbell as Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)
  • Baroness Smith of Basildon as Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords
  • Lucy Powell as Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons

5.53pm: Northern Ireland office

Hilary Benn has been confirmed as Northern Ireland Secretary. Benn, who is Tony Benn’s son, had previously served as Shadow Foreign Secretary until the aftermath of the Brexit referendum.

Ian Murray has also been confirmed as Scotland Secretary, who had been Scotland’s sole surviving Labour MP after the 2019 election.

In addition, Jo Stevens is to be the Welsh Secretary.

5.40pm: Nandy takes the Debbonaire vacancy

Lisa Nandy, who was shadow foreign secretary in Starmer’s early shadow cabinet, has been appointed Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport following shadow portfolio holder Thangam Debbonaire losing her seat to the Greens.

Steve Reed has also been appointed as DEFRA Secretary.

Lisa Nandy MP @lisanandy has been appointed Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport @DCMS. pic.twitter.com/aQdf8CuNQF

— UK Prime Minister (@10DowningStreet) July 5, 2024

5.27pm: ‘Honour of my life’

Rachel Reeves has described being appointed as Chancellor as the “honour of my life” as she becomes the first female holder of the office.

She posted on X: “Economic growth was the Labour Party’s mission. It is now a national mission. Let’s get to work.”

It is the honour of my life to have been appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Economic growth was the Labour Party’s mission. It is now a national mission.

Let’s get to work. pic.twitter.com/PchJFePDJa

— Rachel Reeves (@RachelReevesMP) July 5, 2024

4.51pm: Three more appointments

Three further cabinet appointments have been confirmed by Downing Street:

  • Jonathan Reynolds as Business Secretary
  • Peter Kyle as Science and Technology Secretary
  • Louise Haigh as Transport Secretary

4.45pm: Liz Kendall confirmed

Former Labour leadership contender Liz Kendall, who finished last out of four in the 2015 leadership election, has been confirmed as Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.

4.37pm: Recap – who’s in so far

Several key cabinet roles are yet to be confirmed, but here is the list of formally appointed cabinet ministers so far:

  • Angela Rayner: Deputy Prime Minister and Levelling Up Secretary
  • Rachel Reeves: Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • David Lammy : Foreign Secretary
  • Yvette Cooper: Home Secretary
  • Pat McFadden: Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
  • John Healey: Defence Secretary
  • Shabana Mahmood: Justice Secretary
  • Wes Streeting: Health Secretary
  • Bridget Phillipson: Education Secretary
  • Ed Miliband: Energy Security and Net Zero Secretary

4.15pm: Education, education, education

Bridget Phillipson, whose constituency was the first to be called last night, has been confirmed as Labour’s Education Secretary.

Ed Miliband has also been appointed as Energy Security and Net Zero Secretary.

4.10pm: Streeting in to oversee NHS

Wes Streeting, another MP who faced a fierce independent challenger last night, will be Starmer’s Health Secretary, having held the shadow health portfolio since late 2021.

Wes Streeting MP @wesstreeting has been appointed Secretary of State for Health and Social Care @DHSCgovuk. pic.twitter.com/p4fh1DkH4c

— UK Prime Minister (@10DowningStreet) July 5, 2024

4.06pm: Shabana Mahmood to be Justice Secretary

Shabana Mahmood will continue in her shadow justice portfolio as Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice.

She saw off an independent challenge from Akhmed Yakoob in Birmigham Ladywood last night.

Meanwhile, Darren Jones has now arrived at 10 Downing Street, where he is expected to be appointed to a senior Treasury role.

3.56pm: How will Starmer govern?

Keir Starmer’s first speech to the nation on the steps of Number 10 Downing Street saw him pledge to “restoreserviceandrespecttopolitics.”

“Sowithrespectandhumility,Iinviteyoualltojointhisgovernmentofserviceinthemissionofnationalrenewal.Ourworkisurgent,andwebeginittoday,” he added.

Read the full speech here.

3.53pm: Key confirmations continue

David Lammy and Yvette Cooper have been confirmed as Foreign and Home Secretary respectively, rounding out the Great Offices of State.

John Healey will also carry on his shadow portfolio to become Defence Secretary.

The Rt Hon John Healey MP @JohnHealey_MP has been appointed Secretary of State for Defence @DefenceHQ. pic.twitter.com/K6zP3dO4G5

— UK Prime Minister (@10DowningStreet) July 5, 2024

3.44pm: McFadden confirmed as Chancellor of the Duchy

Pat McFadden, one of Starmer’s closest allies and Labour’s campaigns chief, has been confirmed as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

3.32pm: Miliband enters Downing Street

Ed Miliband has arrived at Number 10 as cabinet appointments continue.

The former Labour leader, who led the party between 2010 and 2015, is expected to hold the climate portfolio.

3.29pm: Britain’s first female Chancellor

Rachel Reeves has been confirmed as Chancellor of the Exchequer, making her the first woman to hold the office.

3.23pm: International congratulations roll in

World leaders from Australia’s Anthony Albanese to Ukraine’s Volodymyr Zelenskyy have already issued their congratulations to Keir Starmer on his election win.

Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is also among the number of high profile international figures to post well wishes.

Congratulations to @UKLabour for a big victory in yesterday's elections.

Let’s hope it’s an omen and work to make it so 🤞

— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) July 5, 2024

3.19pm: Rayner confirmed as Deputy Prime Minister

The first official appointment in Starmer’s cabinet has been confirmed, with Angela Rayner continuing her shadow portfolios.

She will serve as Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities as well as Deputy Prime Minister.

3.18pm: Labour in business

Jonathan Reynolds, who is currently Shadow Business Secretary, is the latest to arrive at Downing Street.

3.14pm: Will there be any surprises?

While many familiar names and faces have shown up at Downing Street so far, we do not yet know for certain who will be assigned which role – although it is likely many will assume their shadow portfolios in government.

Keir Starmer will also need to figure out replacements in his top team for Thangam Debbonaire and Jonathan Ashworth, who lost their seats last night.

3.07pm: More big names arriving

Yvette Cooper and Anneliese Dodds have both been spotted at Downing Street.

3.02pm: David Lammy at Number 10

Shadow Foreign Secretary David Lammy, who was in government during the New Labour years, has entered Number 10 Downing Street.

David Lammy now entering No10. He’s currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. There have been some rumours he may not be appointed to this role, which have been shrugged off by Labour insiders.

— Kate McCann (@KateEMcCann) July 5, 2024

No cabinet appointments have yet been formally confirmed.

Other arrivals include Peter Kyle and Bridget Phillipson.

2.56pm: More top figures showing up at Downing Street

Shabana Mahmood, who saw off a strong independent challenge in her Birmingham constituency, has arrived at Downing Street.

In addition, John Healey has been spotted walking towards Number 10, likely to become Defence Secretary.

Shadow Health Secretary Wes Streeting has also arrived.

2.52pm: Reeves arrives to be appointed Chancellor

Rachel Reeves has become the next Labour frontbencher to show up at Downing Street. The Shadow Chancellor is expected to become the first female Chancellor of the Exchequer in the role’s centuries-long history.

2.51pm: Farage faces protests at post-election speech

Reform UK leader Nigel Farage was heckled by protestors at a speech following his party’s showing at the general election.

He claimed there is “no enthusiasm” for Starmer’s Labour in his speech. Farage won the seat of Clacton in his eighth bid to become an MP.

2.43pm: Pat McFadden becomes second to enter the building

Labour’s campaigns chief Pat McFadden has become the next to go into Number 10 Downing Street, where he is expected to retain his portfolio in Starmer’s top team.

He currently serves as Shadow Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

2.38pm: Angela Rayner goes into Number 10

Labour’s Deputy Leader Angela Rayner has gone into 10 Downing Street. If she keeps her shadow portfolios, she would be set to become Deputy Prime Minister and Levelling Up Secretary.

🚨 BREAKING: Angela Rayner has just gone into No 10 to be appointed Deputy Prime Minister pic.twitter.com/Q1hH2WU03l

— Politics UK (@PolitlcsUK) July 5, 2024

2.32pm: Chief Whip enters Cabinet Office

BBC’ Laura Kunessberg reports that Labour Chief Whip Alan Campbell entered the Cabinet Office a few minutes ago.

Chief Whip, Alan Campbell, went into the Cabinet Office a few mins ago …

— Laura Kuenssberg (@bbclaurak) July 5, 2024

2.22pm: Guardian: ‘Perhaps the least interesting cabinet appointments in history’

The Guardian’s Jessica Elgot echoes Sam Coates’ assessment on the potential for significant continuity in Starmer’s cabinet appointments.

She writes in a post on X: “Soon we go to perhaps the least interesting cabinet appointments in history, where we expect Starmer will make zero changes to any of the positions – apart from Shadow Culture Secretary because Thangam Debbonaire has lost her seat.”

2.11pm: Sky News: Starmer to begin making appointments ‘imminently’

Sky News deputy political editor Sam Coates says Starmer will “imminently” begin appointing his cabinet, he has been told “within the next few minutes”.

He tells viewers: “Most… people who were in the shadow cabinet yesterday think that they’re going to roll over and get the same job in government.”

2.05pm: What to read into Starmer’s decisions

What should we look out for in Keir Starmer’s cabinet?

We’ve got a handy primer here on what Starmer will be weighing up, what to expect and what to read into his choices, by the Institute for Government’s Sachin Savur. Worth a read…

Read more of our 2024 general election results coverage:

Election night as it happened: Key results unpacked in historic landslide

Labour results tracker: Full list and map of Labour gains, holds, losses, new MPs

‘We did it’: Keir Starmer’s victory speech as Labour crosses key 326 seat line

‘A landslide masks discontent left, right and centre. Labour has its work cut out’

‘What should we look for in Keir Starmer’s cabinet?’

‘Keir Starmer is at the peak of his power. How should he make the most of it?’

Read more on how the night unfolded:

Liz Truss loses South West Norfolk: Beaten by a lettuce, beaten by Labour

Scotland results: Labour makes big gains as SNP obliterated

Wales results: Labour bags 27 of 32 seats as Tories wiped off the map

Red Wall: Gains in Stoke, Grimsby, Redcar, Workington, Hartlepool, Barrow, Bishop Auckland, Darlington, Bolsover

Jacob Rees-Mogg: Senior Tory loses seat as Labour mayor Dan Norris wins

Gaza: Jon Ashworth loses in Leicester as independents win Blackburn and Batley

Islington North: Jeremy Corbyn holds on in strong result over Labour

Nuneaton, Stevenage, Swindon, Worcester: Labour wins in key bellwether marginals

Read more on what could come next for Labour in power:

Cabinet and frontbench minister appointments: Live updates as government announcements continue – LabourList (1)

100 days: What happens during the first 100 days of a Labour government?

Delivering pledges: ‘Change is hard – how can Labour achieve it?’

Manifesto: ‘12 great policies you may never have heard of’

Foreign affairs: ‘Whatever happens to Biden, Starmer faces a US challenge’

Trilemma: IFS warns Starmer will likely have to pick cuts, debt or tax hikes

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Cabinet and frontbench minister appointments: Live updates as government announcements continue – LabourList (2024)
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